Bullying

There is no legal definition of bullying. However, at Benhurst, we consider bullying to be behaviour that is:

· regularly repeated;

· intended to hurt someone either physically or emotionally;

· often aimed at certain groups of people e.g. because of their race, religion, ability.


Bullying can take many forms and can include:

· physical assault

· teasing

· making threats

· name calling

· cyberbullying. This can be using a mobile phone or online (e.g. email, social networks, instant messenger)


If you are being bullied, it's important that you tell someone you trust.

· It doesn’t matter what colour hair you have, how you speak, how you walk, how you talk, how clever you are or what you wear – it is not your fault if you are bullied. We are all different in some way and that’s what makes us so special. 

· Bullying can make you feel sad and it’s okay to be upset about it. The important thing is that you tell someone about it straight away. 

· Talk to an adult at school you trust or a family member. If you don’t want to do that you can always call Childline on 0800 1111 or visit  www.childline.org.uk.

· You can write a note in the school's Worry Box outside Mr Denchfield's room. Mr Denchfield will then speak with you and try to help. 

· It can be tempting if you are being bullied to take revenge. This is not a good idea – you may get into trouble and can make the situation worse. 

· Think about ways you can respond to bullying. For example, practice saying ‘I don’t like it when you say that/do that – please stop.'

· Only spend time with people who make you feel good about yourself. If someone constantly puts you down they are not a real friend.

· Remember to respect other people! Just because someone is different to you and your friends – that doesn’t mean you are better than them or have a right to make them feel bad. If you make a mistake, say sorry.  You don’t have to be friends with everyone – but you should always make it clear that you don’t like it when people are unkind to others.